Category: Archived

Older emergency posts that are now archived

Power restored to most affected buildings

Power has been restored to almost all buildings that were affected by the overnight outage and the brief additional planned outage at 3:30 p.m. today. We expect power to be restored to the Bookstore and the Barnum Center early this evening.

Initial assessment indicates that a failed power cable, located between Stern Hall and the Bookstore, led to the initial outage Tuesday night that affected certain buildings on the central and east side of the main Stanford campus. LBRE will be conducting further assessment work. We appreciate the university community’s patience and understanding during this event.

Several buildings to lose power for 30 minutes at 3:30 p.m.

In order to restore power to a number of buildings affected by the overnight power outage, several additional buildings on the main Stanford campus will need to lose power for 30 minutes at 3:30 p.m. today. An adjacent line serving these buildings needs to be powered down in order to power up a line originally affected by the outage.

The following buildings will lose power for approximately 30 minutes at 3:30 p.m. today:

  • Branner Hall
  • Encina Hall and Commons
  • Terman Engineering (parts of Building 02-500)
  • The Nitery
  • Toyon Hall
  • Wilbur Hall
  • Several construction trailers

Please note that some of these buildings may have emergency backup power during this period.

For other buildings affected by the original overnight outage, the restoration of power, originally scheduled to begin after 12 noon today, will need to wait for this additional step to occur. We hope to see power restoration beginning in the 4:00 hour.

The Bookstore and Barnum Center are still expected to see power restoration later in the day.

We apologize for this inconvenience and appreciate the community’s patience. Updates will continue to be available on this page.

9:45 a.m. update on power

Technicians are working to restore power to affected buildings on the main Stanford campus.

The affected student residences, along with most of the other buildings affected by the power outage, should see power begin to be restored after 12 noon today. Power will come back online in stages.

LBRE reports that power to the Bookstore and the Barnum Center is not estimated to be restored until the end of the business day, due to the location of the fault. The Bookstore is closed during the power outage.

The campus as a whole is open and operating. Vaden Health Center continues to be operating today. Updates will continue to be provided on this page.

8 a.m. update on power

Technicians have identified a fault believed to be the cause of the power outage affecting some buildings on the east side of the main Stanford campus. Electricians will be working to isolate it and then begin the process of re-energizing the line. It is estimated that fully restoring power in the area could take up to 8 hours.

Some buildings in the affected area, including Stern Hall and Vaden Health Center, are operating on backup generator power. Vaden plans to be operating as usual today.

Student residences without power are Crothers and some houses in the Cowell Cluster. Students in these residences are welcome to dine at the Arrillaga Family Dining Commons, which is open and operating.

No classes are believed to be affected by the outage. Some scheduled events may be moved out of the Barnum Center today due to the outage.

Thank you to those affected for your patience with the situation. Additional updates will be posted, when available, on this page.

Update: Power outage on eastern side of main campus

Technicians continue to investigate a power outage that has affected some student residences and other buildings on the eastern side of the main Stanford campus.

There is no estimated time of restoration.

Some buildings in the affected area continue to operate on generator power.

To those affected, thank you for your continued patience. Updates will be provided on this website when available.

Update: Power outage on part of east campus

Crews are continuing to investigate a power outage that has affected some student residences and other buildings on the eastern side of the main Stanford campus.

The estimated time of the outage is up to 7 hours, depending upon how quickly the source of the problem is identified and resolved.

Some buildings in the affected area continue to operate on generator power.

Arrillaga Family Dining Commons will be extending its late-night hours, which normally end at 2:30 a.m., to accommodate students.

For student residences that are without power for a number of hours, the main entrance will be rekeyed to allow students to use their room key for entry when card readers cease to function. As always, please call 911 to report any suspicious circumstances.

In student residences without power, flashlights for personal use and lanterns for main lounges are being distributed. Candles and open flames should NOT be used.

Thank you, to those affected, for your patience with the situation. Updates will be provided on this website when available.

Thursday update on PG&E power situation

The main Stanford campus, Stanford Redwood City and SLAC are open and operating, and there continues to be no indication that they will be affected by PG&E’s power shutoffs in the Bay Area.

Additional shutoffs were implemented in the region overnight. PG&E is reporting this morning that customers in Santa Clara, San Mateo and several other counties who have not yet lost power should not lose it during this power shutoff event. PG&E has outage maps available at https://m.pge.com/#outages and http://critweb-outage.pgealerts.com.

We know that some employees have been affected by power shutoffs at their homes. Managers are encouraged to provide flexibility. Please be in touch with your manager if you are affected and need to discuss alternate work arrangements.

Stanford is continuing to monitor the situation closely. If there are any major changes in the situation for Stanford, members of the university community will be informed via the AlertSU system. Ongoing updates will be provided on this website. SLAC continues to provide SLAC-specific information to its community at https://emergency.slac.stanford.edu.

Wednesday update on PG&E power situation

The latest information from PG&E continues to indicate that the main Stanford campus, Stanford Redwood City and SLAC are not expected to be affected by the Public Safety Power Shutoffs in Northern California. Stanford will be open and operating on Thursday, October 10.

PG&E postponed some of its planned shutoffs in the Bay Area from this afternoon until this evening due to refined weather predictions. Please be aware that shutoffs are still expected to be occurring in some surrounding areas, including areas where Stanford employees live.

For staff employees, if a PG&E power shutoff at your home or at your child’s school affects your ability to come to work, please be in touch with your manager to discuss any arrangements that may be needed. Please also take the necessary precautionary measures at your home if you expect to be affected by the shutoffs.

Stanford is continuing to monitor the situation closely. If there are any major changes in the situation for Stanford, members of the university community will be informed via the AlertSU system. Ongoing updates will be provided on the https://emergency.stanford.edu website. SLAC continues to provide SLAC-specific information to its community at https://emergency.slac.stanford.edu.

Due to a Red Flag Warning for high winds and low humidity, the Dish will be closed on Thursday. Information is available on the Dish website.

Tuesday afternoon update on PG&E power situation

There have been no further updates pertaining to Stanford this afternoon on the PG&E power shutoff situation in Northern California. Stanford will be open and operating on Wednesday, October 9. Please continue to refer to the links and resources below. For staff employees, if a PG&E power shutoff at your home or at your child’s school affects your ability to come to work, please be in touch with your manager to discuss any arrangements that may be needed.

Tuesday morning update on PG&E power situation

The main Stanford campus, Stanford Redwood City and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory continue to be outside the areas that PG&E says could be affected by Public Safety Power Shutoffs beginning early Wednesday morning.

The PG&E website has been updated with numbers of potentially affected customers in specific communities around Northern California. PG&E’s map of potentially affected areas is available here.

Please continue to consult the resources and links available below, and keep in mind that your home could be affected depending on where you live. Information to help you prepare for an outage at your home is available on the PG&E website.

If the situation changes for Stanford, updates will be provided via the AlertSU system and this website.

The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory will provide any SLAC-specific information to its community, including on its Emergency Information website.

Information on PG&E power

PG&E announced today that it is considering Public Safety Power Shutoffs on Wednesday and Thursday in portions of many counties in Northern California and the Bay Area. These potential shutoffs are being considered due to expected high winds and elevated fire danger in the region on Wednesday and Thursday.

At this time, Stanford sites including the main Stanford campus, Stanford Redwood City and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are NOT among the areas expected to be affected by these shutoffs. The Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve, in the foothills to the west of the main Stanford campus, could potentially be affected.

Stanford is monitoring the situation and will provide updates if the situation changes.

Because it is possible for the situation to change with little or no notice, we encourage those running research operations or other activities that could be damaged by an unexpected power outage to consider the option of postponing operations beyond this Wednesday and Thursday, where possible. While PG&E has said it will aim to provide at least 8 hours of notice in the event of an actual power shutoff, this notice is not guaranteed.

Environmental Health & Safety offers preparation guidance for researchers and those working in lab environments at https://ehs.stanford.edu/topic/lab-safety/power-outage-prep.

In addition, please be aware that even if Stanford is not affected by an outage, your home could be. Please consult the PG&E website for details and tips for anticipating a power outage.

A list of possible affected areas is available here: https://www.pge.com/en_US/safety/emergency-preparedness/natural-disaster/wildfires/public-safety-event.page?WT.mc_id=Vanity_pspsupdates

A map of possible affected areas is available here: https://www.pge.com/en_US/safety/emergency-preparedness/natural-disaster/wildfires/psps-service-impact-map.page

Tips and additional information are available here: https://www.pge.com/en_US/safety/emergency-preparedness/natural-disaster/wildfires/public-safety-power-shutoff-faq.page

Updates will be sent via the AlertSU system if the situation changes, and any new information also will be posted at 10 a.m. Tuesday at https://emergency.stanford.edu.

Chilled water curtailment ending

The current Stage 1 curtailment will end this morning. Campus buildings will return to chilled water service by this afternoon. We expect this will be the final notification for this curtailment event.

Stage 1 Cooling Curtailment

Due to multiple warmer than normal nights with high humidity and forecast high temperatures, Stanford is implementing Stage 1 Chilled Water Curtailment starting immediately.

Under Stage 1, cooling is reduced in many offices and other parts of the campus not involved in medical, research, data processing and other facilities. Temperatures in occupied spaces are allowed to exceed campus guidelines. A complete description of the impact and a list of affected buildings can be found in Land, Buildings & Real Estate’s chilled water curtailment guide.

Works is progressing on the temporary cooling tower for the chilled water system that cools many buildings on the main campus and Stanford expects to have it connected and operational on Monday. The new tower expands chilled water capacity on the campus by 35 percent.

Updates will be provided here and through the AlertSU system.

Cooling curtailment ending

Installation has been substantially completed on new temporary cooling towers for the chilled water system that cools many buildings on the main Stanford campus. The new towers expand chilled water capacity on the campus by 35 percent.

The current Stage 1 and Stage 2 curtailment will be ending Monday morning. Campus buildings will have normal chilled water service tomorrow morning. We expect this will be the final notification for this curtailment event.

Cooling curtailment remains at Stages 1-2

Stage 1 and Stage 2 chilled water curtailment will continue on the main Stanford campus through the weekend.

We will continue to monitor campus loads and weather forecasts. This will be the final update until Monday unless circumstances change.

Please continue to consult the Chilled Water Curtailment Guide for additional information. Updates will be provided through the AlertSU system and at emergency.stanford.edu.

Stage 3-4 curtailment ending

Due to lower temperature and humidity forecasts, Stage 3 and Stage 4 chilled water curtailment will be ending on the main Stanford campus starting immediately this morning. Chilled water service will return to Stage 3 and Stage 4 buildings throughout the morning.

We expect to remain in Stage 1 and Stage 2 curtailment through the weekend. The university will continue to monitor campus loads and weather forecasts.

Please consult the Chilled Water Curtailment Guide for information and contact building facilities representatives for additional support. Updates will continue to be provided through the AlertSU system and at emergency.stanford.edu.

Stage 4 cooling curtailment continues

The main Stanford campus is continuing at a Stage 4 curtailment of the chilled water system.

We expect the Stage 4 curtailment to continue into the evening, and we expect some level of curtailment to continue into the weekend, based on current heat and humidity forecasts.

The situation is being monitored constantly, and updates will be available via the AlertSU system and at emergency.stanford.edu. Work also is continuing on new temporary cooling towers to add capacity to the chilled water system in the near future.

If you are on the main campus and are in a building that is on the chilled water system, you can continue helping reduce loads by turning off unnecessary lights and equipment and screening windows from direct sunlight. Wherever your location, please stay hydrated and look out for the health needs of those around you.

Researchers can continue to be in touch with building managers where necessary to consult on protecting equipment and continuity of research projects.

We encourage managers to continue monitoring the needs of employees and have discussions with employees about alternate work arrangements if needed due to the temperature in their location. If your manager is not available, please contact Human Resources for assistance.

More information on the chilled water curtailment process, and steps to take in response, are in the Chilled Water Curtailment Guide.

More information on Stages 1-4 curtailment

Stanford is continuing to implement Stage 1 through 4 Chilled Water Curtailment on the main Stanford campus this morning.

Here is more information about the situation:

CONDITIONS: Warm and very humid overnight conditions resulted in very large loads being pulled through the campus cooling system. The resulting reduction in our chilled water supply, combined with high forecast temperatures and humidity that will further tax the system today, led to the multi-stage curtailment that is now in effect. High humidity is a challenging part of this week’s conditions, as opposed to the high temperatures alone that were present last week.

ACTIONS YOU CAN TAKE: We are asking everyone on the main campus to help reduce the loads on the system. Turning off lights, closing blinds or covering windows exposed to direct sunlight, and turning off unnecessary equipment all help. See the curtailment guide for details, up to and including Stage 4 curtailment.

DURATION: The chilled water system is being continuously monitored, and updates are being provided to building managers every two hours. We do not have an expected duration for the curtailment. Forecasts for the next several days indicate an easing of overnight temperatures and humidity, but higher afternoon temperatures.

TEMPORARY TOWERS: After the cooling curtailment that occurred in June, new temporary cooling towers were ordered to increase the capacity of the chilled water system. These temporary towers have been scheduled to be in place by the end of August, but efforts are under way to accelerate their installation. In addition, longer-term plans are under way for increased chilled water capacity that will mitigate the need to curtail during extreme heat.

LAB SAFETY: Researchers should coordinate with building managers where needed regarding specific, localized mitigations to address impacts to research and equipment. As you do so, Environmental Health & Safety has the following reminders for those working in laboratories:

  • Wear proper PPE (personal protective equipment) and street clothes.
  • Avoid the use of fans in laboratories, as they may adversely affect exhaust ventilation.
  • PIs and supervisors must assess the conditions in their facilities to ensure safe and healthy working conditions. Check in with employees on their welfare and provide alternate work if conditions do not allow for safe lab work.

MANAGERS AND EMPLOYEES: During the cooling curtailment, managers should encourage precautionary measures and have discussions with employees about alternate work arrangements if needed due to the temperature in their location. If your manager is not available, please contact Human Resources for assistance.

Continued updates will be available through the AlertSU system and on emergency.stanford.edu.

Chilled water curtailment Stages 1-4 today

Due to warm and very humid overnight conditions, forecast high temperatures and very high humidity today, and currently low chilled water thermal storage tank levels, Stanford needs to implement Stage 1 through 4 Chilled Water Curtailment starting immediately. Take immediate actions necessary to protect sensitive equipment.

Please reference the below Chilled Water Curtailment Guide for impacted buildings by stage and contact your building facilities representatives for additional support. All Stages 1 through 4 are included in this curtailment:

https://lbre.stanford.edu/sites/lbre-production/files/stanford_chilled_water_curtailment_guide_07-19-public_1.pdf

Building management in all buildings can help us to reduce chilled water load and prevent higher stages of curtailment by implementing the following measures:

– Close window coverings on sunny exposures
– Raise thermostat set points to 78F in office and common areas
– Close laboratory fume hood sashes when not in use
– Close operable windows in air conditioned buildings
– Shut off unused office equipment
– Turn off lights in unoccupied areas
– Where possible, shut off lab equipment not currently being used

Updates will be sent when available and will be posted at emergency.stanford.edu.

Cooling curtailment ended on main campus

Cooling curtailment for all stages is now ended. Operations will return to normal over the next few hours.

Cooling curtailment easing on main campus

Cooling curtailment began easing on the main campus this morning, Friday, August 16, with cooling being restored incrementally in buildings covered under Stage 4 through 11 a.m. During that period conditions of the chilled water system will be monitored, as will actual versus predicted temperatures.

Stage 3 remains in place while cooling is restored in Stage 4 buildings. If all goes well with Stage 4 release, Stage 3 facilities will be evaluated.

Under Stage 3, temperatures in sensitive-conditioned teaching, research, or commercial operations spaces are allowed to exceed campus guidelines. A complete description of the impact and a list of affected buildings can be found in Land, Buildings & Real Estate’s chilled water curtailment guide.

Additional capacity for the chilled water system that cools the campus is being planned in both the short and longer terms. To aid with short-term mitigation, temporary cooling towers are now being added to provide supplemental capacity. These temporary towers are expected to be in place by the end of the month. Even with these enhancements, the capacity of the system will be challenged by weather events that include temperatures in the upper 90s/100s over multiple days.

The university will be examining further ways of decreasing the load on the system in the earlier stages of a heat wave to prevent research disruption. Land, Buildings & Real Estate is forming an advisory committee of faculty members and facilities directors to assist with this effort.

Updates will be posted here after 11 a.m. and whenever there is further information.

Extreme Heat: Curtailment level maintained on main campus

A Stage 4 Chilled Water Curtailment is being maintained on the main campus through at least tomorrow, Friday, morning.

At Stage 4 curtailment, in addition to previous impacts already noted, temperatures in the research, data processing or communications spaces are allowed to exceed specifications and the water used to cool equipment in those spaces will be affected.

The university is asking for your help in this curtailment. Please shut off all non-essential equipment to reduce load and preserve chilled water for essential needs. Researchers should coordinate with building managers if there are specific, localized mitigations they can undertake while the curtailment is in effect. For further instructions, please see Land, Building & Real Estate’s chilled water curtailment guide.

As many campus buildings will be noticeably warmer throughout the morning tomorrow, managers should continue to encourage precautionary measures and have discussions with employees about alternate work arrangements if needed, such as working from a cooler location nearby, telecommuting, flexible work schedules, or, if necessary, other options as appropriate during times of excessive heat.

Extreme heat: Still further cooling curtailment on main campus

A Stage 4 Chilled Water Curtailment has been implemented on the main campus this afternoon.

Current temperatures are 4 degrees higher than yesterday’s record temps and about 8 degrees hotter than this morning’s forecast. We expect that temperatures will increase over the next few hours.

At Stage 4 curtailment, in addition to previous impacts already noted, temperatures in the research, data processing or communications spaces are allowed to exceed specifications and the water used to cool equipment in those spaces will be affected.

The university is asking for your help in this curtailment. Please shut off all non-essential equipment to reduce load and preserve chilled water for essential needs. Researchers should coordinate with building managers if there are specific, localized mitigations they can undertake while the curtailment is in effect.

Please see Land, Building & Real Estate’s chilled water curtailment guide for further instructions.

The duration of the curtailment is unclear at this time. Updates will be posted here this evening and whenever there is further information.

During this cooling curtailment, managers should encourage precautionary measures and have discussions with employees about alternate work arrangements if needed due to the temperature in their location. If your manager is not available, please contact Human Resources for assistance.

Extreme heat: Further cooling curtailment on main campus

A Stage 3 Chilled Water Curtailment, affecting building cooling in more campus academic buildings and offices, is being implemented on the main Stanford campus this morning, Thursday, Aug. 15, and is expected to be in place at least through Friday morning.

Campus buildings are cooled by a chilled water system. Due to the unusually high current temperatures, along with expected high overnight temperatures, the Central Energy Facility (CEF) chilled water must be curtailed. A chilled water curtailment is required to reduce load and restore chilled water storage to normal levels.

Under Stage 3, temperatures in sensitive-conditioned teaching, research, or commercial operations spaces are allowed to exceed campus guidelines. A complete description of the impact and a list of affected buildings can be found in Land, Buildings & Real Estate’s chilled water curtailment guide.

Note that the stages for curtailment are cumulative, so the buildings affected under Stage 1 and 2, which were implemented on Wednesday, remain in place. See the chilled water curtailment guide for details.

The reduced load will help us make it through this heat wave. The duration of the curtailment is unclear at this time. Updates will be posted here this evening and whenever there is further information.

During this cooling curtailment, managers should encourage precautionary measures and have discussions with employees about alternate work arrangements if needed due to the temperature in their location. If your manager is not available, please contact Human Resources for assistance.

Extreme heat: Cooling curtailed on main campus

A Stage 1 and Stage 2 Chilled Water Curtailment, affecting building cooling in many campus academic buildings and offices, is being implemented on the main Stanford campus this evening, Wednesday, August 14, that is expected to be in place at least through Thursday evening.

Campus buildings are cooled by a chilled water system. Due to the unusually high current temperatures, along with expected high overnight temperatures, the Central Energy Facility (CEF) chilled water must be curtailed.  A chilled water curtailment is required to reduce load and restore chilled water storage to normal levels.

Under Stage 1, cooling is reduced in many offices and other parts of the campus not involved in medical, research, data processing and other facilities. Temperatures in occupied spaces are allowed to exceed campus guidelines. A complete description of the impact and a list of affected buildings can be found in Land, Buildings & Real Estate’s chilled water curtailment guide.

In addition, the campus will transition into a Stage 2 curtailment during that period, which will allow temperatures in teaching, research or commercial operation spaces to exceed the campus guidelines, resulting in short-term impact to teaching research and commercial operations. A complete description of the impact of Stage 2 and a list of affected buildings can also be found in the chilled water curtailment guide.

The reduced load will help us make it through this heat wave. The duration of the curtailment is unclear at this time. Updates will be posted here on Thursday morning and whenever there is further information.

During this cooling curtailment, managers should encourage precautionary measures and have discussions with employees about alternate work arrangements if needed due to the temperature in their location. If your manager is not available, please contact Human Resources for assistance.

Cooling curtailment ending on main campus

The forecast today, Thursday, June 13, calls for cooler temperatures on the main Stanford campus. Curtailment will end today for all buildings.

Cooling will be released over the course of the day, beginning with buildings hosting Commencement events, laboratories, libraries and museums, followed by comfort cooling spaces. If you don’t see improvement by the end of the day, please contact your facilities representatives.

The university continues to appreciate the campus community’s patience with the curtailment this week.

Extreme Heat: Cooling curtailment continues for now; precautionary measures encouraged

The forecast today indicates a high temperature of 88 degrees at noon on the main Stanford campus.  This week’s temperatures have been about 10 degrees higher than predicted, so we will continue with our current curtailment levels throughout today, Wednesday, June 12. If the forecast holds as predicted, we expect to selectively ease curtailment in buildings throughout the day.

Cooling will be maintained in hospitals, life safety areas, classrooms with finals, and venues where large events are taking place such as the Arrillaga Alumni Center, the Traitel Building, the Gunn-SIEPR Building and Bechtel Conference Center.

Cooling will remain off in all other buildings on the university’s chilled water system. Laboratories, offices, classrooms not holding finals, dining halls and kitchens are affected, as are residences Jack McDonald Hall, Munger Graduate Residence and Schwab Residential Center. Other dormitories don’t have cooled water and thus are not affected. Building managers will be contacted by their zone or facilities operations managers to provide further information.

As many campus buildings will be noticeably warmer throughout the morning, managers should continue to encourage precautionary measures and have discussions with employees about alternate work arrangements if needed, such as working from a cooler location nearby, telecommuting, flexible work schedules, or, if necessary, other options as appropriate during times of excessive heat.

Employees with certain medical conditions should check with their personal physician to get a recommendation related to working during a heat wave. Staff who are unable to work may use accrued paid time off to continue to be paid.

Staying hydrated is particularly important during a heat wave. Drink plenty of water during the day and look out for each other by encouraging your colleagues to drink extra water, too. Wearing cotton clothing can also increase your comfort during excessive heat.

The university continues to appreciate the campus community’s patience with this curtailment. A system check will be conducted later this morning and updates will be posted here after noon or before should there be any changes that affect the campus.

Extreme heat: Cooling curtailment continues on main campus

Chilled water curtailment efforts needed to maintain cooling in key buildings on the main Stanford campus will continue at least until noon on Wednesday, June 12. Cooling will be maintained in hospitals, life safety areas, classrooms with finals, and venues where large events are taking place such as the Arrillaga Alumni Center, the Traitel Building, the Gunn-SIEPR Building and Bechtel Conference Center.

Cooling will remain off in all other buildings on the university’s chilled water system. Laboratories, offices, classrooms not holding finals, dining halls and kitchens are affected, as are residences Jack McDonald Hall, Munger Graduate Residence and Schwab Residential Center. Other dormitories don’t have cooled water and thus are not affected. Building managers will be contacted by their zone or facilities operations managers to provide further information.

Managers should encourage precautionary measures and have discussions with employees about alternate work arrangements if needed due to the temperature in their location.

The university continues to appreciate the campus community’s patience with this curtailment. A system check Wednesday morning will provide more information about the weather forecast for the day and the state of the chilled water supply at the Central Energy Facility.  Updates will be posted here after 9 a.m.  or before should there be any changes that affect the campus.

Extreme heat: Cooling turned off in some buildings on main campus

Further chilled water curtailment is needed to maintain cooling in key buildings on the main Stanford campus today, Tuesday, June 11. Cooling will be maintained in hospitals, life safety areas, classrooms with finals, and venues with large events scheduled for this afternoon such as  the Arrillaga Alumni Center, the Traitel Building, the Gunn-SIEPR Building and Bechtel Conference Center.

Cooling will be turned off in all other buildings on the university’s chilled water system. Laboratories, offices, classrooms not holding finals, dining halls and kitchens are affected, as are residences Jack McDonald Hall, Munger Graduate Residence and Schwab Residential Center. Other dormitories don’t have cooled water and thus are not affected. Building managers will be contacted by their zone or facilities operations managers to provide further information.

Buildings where cooling is turned off will rapidly become much warmer than normal this afternoon and evening. Managers should encourage precautionary measures and have discussions with employees about alternate work arrangements if needed due to the temperature in their location.

The university continues to appreciate the campus community’s patience with this curtailment. This is a dynamic situation that may continue through tonight and into tomorrow.  Updates will be posted here on Tuesday evening  and whenever there is further information.

Extreme heat: Cooling further curtailed on main campus

A Stage 2 Chilled Water Curtailment, affecting the cooling in campus labs, offices and classroom spaces that are not holding final exams, is being implemented on the main Stanford campus today, Tuesday, June 11. Classrooms with final exams scheduled will not be curtailed.

Campus buildings are cooled by a chilled water system. Due to the persistent high temperatures through Monday evening, combined with higher than normal temperatures overnight, the Central Energy Facility (CEF) chilled water must be further curtailed to meet critical loads throughout the day.

A Stage 2 curtailment means that temperatures in labs, offices and classrooms are allowed to exceed campus guidelines for a limited time. A detailed description of Stage 2 curtailment, along with suggested potential actions to minimize impact, can be found in the Land, Buildings & Real Estate’s curtailment guide.

The reduced load will help us make it through this heat wave. The  curtailment is expected to last through Tuesday evening. Updates will be posted here on Tuesday evening  and whenever there is further information.

We greatly appreciate your patience. Please take care to stay hydrated and be alert to the needs of your colleagues if the cooling in your location is affected by this curtailment. Environmental Health & Safety has posted an high heat work advisory on its website.

Extreme heat: Comfort cooling curtailed on main campus

A Stage 1 Chilled Water Curtailment, affecting building comfort cooling in many campus academic buildings and offices, is being implemented on the main Stanford campus this afternoon, Monday, June 10, that is expected to be in place at least through Tuesday evening.

Campus buildings are cooled by a chilled water system. Due to the unusually high current temperatures, along with expected high overnight temperatures, the Central Energy Facility (CEF) chilled water must be curtailed.  A chilled water curtailment is required to reduce load and restore chilled water storage to normal levels.

A Stage 1 curtailment means that, in order to preserve sufficient cooling capacity for medical, research, data processing and other facilities, comfort cooling is reduced in many offices and other parts of the campus. A detailed description of Stage 1 curtailment can be found in Land, Buildings & Real Estate’s curtailment guide.

The reduced load will help us make it through this heat wave. The duration of the curtailment is unclear at this time. Updates will be posted here on Tuesday evening  and whenever there is further information.

We greatly appreciate your patience. Please take care to stay hydrated and be alert to the needs of your colleagues if the cooling in your location is affected by this curtailment. Environmental Health & Safety has posted an high heat work advisory on its website.

Air quality update

For those returning to the Stanford campus after travels elsewhere this week: Local air quality has improved substantially following rain and the diminishment of the Camp Fire in Butte County, which is now 95 percent contained.

As of Friday morning, air quality readings at Stanford’s nearest official reporting station in Redwood City are back in the “good” range.

We expect the Stanford campus to be operating normally this coming week (the week of November 26), and we appreciate the patience and understanding of everyone during the recent period of smoky air.

As a reminder, this year’s Cardinal at Work Cares Donation Drive has expanded to benefit those affected by the recent wildfires. The drive, open through Friday, November 30, will help provide wildfire victims in Paradise and elsewhere in the state with basic personal care and toiletry essentials. Please see the Cardinal at Work Cares website for additional information.

Sunday air quality update

Air quality in the area around Stanford has been slightly better over the weekend, though smoky and stagnant air continues to be predicted for the Bay Area over the next couple of days. At the official air quality measuring station nearest Stanford in Redwood City, air quality readings overnight were in the “unhealthy for sensitive groups” range but climbed again into the “unhealthy” range during the day on Sunday.

Stanford deeply appreciates our community’s continued understanding and cooperation as the region manages the continuing effects of wildfire smoke.

CAMPUS OPERATIONS: While there are no classes this week during the university’s regularly scheduled Thanksgiving Recess, other university operations are expected to remain open and operating Monday through Wednesday. Employees, please consult with your supervisor if your personal situation or health concerns mean that you need to consider alternate work arrangements. We encourage managers to provide as much flexibility as possible for employees during this challenging period, while continuing the university’s operations.

EVENTS: The university recommends that campus events be held indoors to the greatest extent possible.

CHILD CARE: Child care centers on the Stanford campus will be open Monday through Wednesday and operate according to their normal hours.

FOOTHILLS: The Dish and Matadero Trail in the foothills are expected to remain closed while air quality levels are unhealthy. Check The Dish website for updates.

N95 MASKS: For employees, if you wish to have an N95 mask for your outdoor activity, please consult with your supervisor, or with your departmental human resources manager in the absence of a supervisor this week. Supervisors, HR managers, faculty members and others with questions about mask availability may contact Environmental Health & Safety at (650) 723-0448.

ASSISTING WILDFIRE VICTIMS: The third annual Cardinal at Work Cares Donation Drive has expanded to benefit those affected by the recent wildfires. The drive will help provide wildfire victims in Paradise and throughout the state with basic personal care and toiletry essentials. Please see the Cardinal at Work Cares website for additional information.

If circumstances change over the course of the week, updates for the Stanford community will be posted on the emergency.stanford.edu website.

Friday afternoon update on air quality

Stanford continues to monitor air quality conditions as a result of wildfire smoke. Official readings in the local area have continued to be in the “unhealthy” range today.

The Bay Area Air Quality Management District has extended its Winter Spare the Air Alert through Tuesday, November 20, saying that current conditions may persist until then. “While weather conditions will vary somewhat in the coming days, air quality is expected to remain unhealthy because there is so much smoke trapped at the surface and surrounding the region,” the air district reports.

Updates as we head into the weekend:

Please continue to take steps to limit your exposure, including remaining indoors and limiting outdoor activity. Consult the Environmental Health & Safety website for additional information.

Outdoor student events for the rest of today and this evening have been canceled. Indoor student events will proceed, following recommended guidelines, including the Frosh Formal and Gaieties.

For employees, if your work requires prolonged outdoor exposure, you may consult with your supervisor to obtain an N95 mask. Supervisors can contact Environmental Health & Safety at (650) 723-0448 for more information. If you are experiencing a specific health concern, please contact your healthcare provider.

The Dish and Matadero Trail in the foothills are expected to remain closed through the weekend. Check The Dish website for any updates.

Updates on athletic events continue to be provided on the Stanford Athletics website. Big Game has been rescheduled for Saturday, December 1, at UC Berkeley.

VTA, SamTrans and Muni are offering free rides on all bus and light rail service today (Friday, November 16) in response to the air quality conditions. More information is available on the Parking & Transportation Services website.

While there are no classes next week during the university’s regularly scheduled Thanksgiving Recess, other university operations are expected to remain open and operating Monday through Wednesday. Just as the university advised employees for today, please consult with your supervisor if your personal situation or health concerns mean that you need to consider alternate work arrangements. We encourage managers to provide as much flexibility as possible for employees during this challenging period, while continuing the university’s operations.

The university will continue to monitor events over the weekend and will provide any updates as necessary on the emergency.stanford.edu website.

Thank you again for your patience and understanding during this difficult time for so many people in our state.

Big Game rescheduled; other athletics events updated

Tomorrow’s Big Game at UC Berkeley has been rescheduled to Saturday, December 1, due to continuing poor air quality in the Bay Area. Additional information is available here.

In addition, several athletic events scheduled to be held at Stanford today and over the weekend have been moved or canceled. Tonight’s men’s basketball game and Sunday’s women’s basketball game have both been canceled. NCAA women’s soccer this evening has been moved to the Salinas Sports Complex. For more information, visit the Stanford Athletics website.

Further updates for the campus community regarding local air quality and related issues will be available later today at http://emergency.stanford.edu.

Classes canceled Friday; information for employees

To our campus community,

Throughout this week, the university has been monitoring the air quality effects from the devastating fires that have occurred in California. While there has been a great deal of variability, there has been a significant increase in smoke in the area around Stanford over the last 24 hours, with official readings beginning to creep into the “very unhealthy” category.

Out of an abundance of caution, we have made the decision to cancel classes at Stanford on Friday, November 16. Local Air Quality Index numbers increased this evening, and the Bay Area Air Quality Management District has said that the readings are likely to be worse in the region on Friday.

Other operations at the university will remain open on Friday — but we clearly recognize that this extraordinary set of circumstances is affecting many people in our community in different ways, and we want to provide the greatest flexibility possible for our employees. We know, for instance, that many school districts around the Bay Area have canceled classes on Friday, which will pose child care issues for parents.

Public safety, student services, residential and dining services, and other essential operations need to retain full on-campus staffing on Friday. Other university offices also will remain open, but employees should consult with their supervisors to address their individual circumstances. There will be many cases in which you may be able to work from home, use accrued leave to take the day off, or make another alternate work arrangement with your supervisor if your personal situation or health concerns will make it difficult for you to come to work.

As reported earlier, students who feel they need an N95 mask can obtain one by visiting the Vaden Health Center while supplies are available. (To be effective, a mask needs to be fitted properly with a seal. The best advice continues to be to limit prolonged air exposure and to avoid strenuous outdoor activity.) Students with other questions or needs should be in touch with your Resident Assistants, Resident Fellows, Residence Dean or Graduate Life Office Dean.

The university will be limiting unnecessary outdoor work for employees, and grounds crews who have prolonged strenuous outdoor work responsibilities will not be at work on Friday. Still, if you are an employee with concerns about performing your work due to the air quality, please be in touch with your supervisor. Supervisors can contact Environmental Health & Safety at (650) 723-0448 if they have questions or need assistance.

Stanford Athletics will be reviewing the air quality situation as scheduled athletic events approach, and will make decisions about events based on guiding policies. A number of events are scheduled for later in the day on Friday and into the evening, and conditions may change between now and then. Updates will be available on the Stanford Athletics website.

Additional guidance and links to other resources continue to be available on the Environmental Health & Safety website.

Thank you for your perseverance and understanding during this challenging time for so many people, here and across California, and most especially in the communities that have been ravaged by these recent wildfires.

Persis Drell
Provost

Air quality update: Outdoor activities; use of masks

Environmental Health & Safety continues to monitor the air quality situation as a result of wildfire smoke in the Bay Area.

For the rest of the afternoon, the university encourages the following: Any classes with an outdoor component should make alternate arrangements. Hosts of events scheduled for outdoors also should consider indoor alternatives if possible.

The university has received questions today about the use of masks. As EH&S has shared in previous guidance, masks have limited effectiveness and are not recommended for healthy individuals. Often, people wear respirator masks incorrectly or too loosely. In addition, using respirator masks can make it harder to breathe, which may worsen existing medical conditions.

The best guidance is to limit outdoor exposure and to avoid strenuous outdoor activity. (Typically, this means outdoor activity that causes you to breathe hard, or activity you’ll be doing intermittently for several hours that makes you breathe slightly harder than normal. Consider the difference between a short bike ride to class and a prolonged vigorous run.)

However, given the air quality conditions today, students who feel they need an N95 mask can obtain one by visiting the Vaden Health Center, which is open until 8 p.m. this evening. For employees who have outdoor responsibilities, please consult your supervisor if you have concerns about performing your work due to the air quality. Supervisors can be in touch with Environmental Health & Safety at (650) 723-0448 if they have questions or need assistance.

Please continue to refer to the additional guidance on the EH&S website. Additional updates will be provided on the emergency.stanford.edu website as they become available.

Air quality update

Our thoughts at Stanford continue to be with the many people directly affected by the devastating wildfires in California.

The Bay Area continues to see wildfire smoke, which has been increasing again over the last 24 hours. So far, air quality readings reported by the Bay Area Air Quality Management District at the nearest official reporting station in Redwood City have remained below the 201 level for particle pollution, which is considered the beginning of the “very unhealthy” category for air quality. As a result, the university has been continuing most regular operations, with all members of the community encouraged to take precautions for their personal health and comfort.

Environmental Health & Safety is continuously monitoring the local Air Quality Index readings. As of 12 noon, the Redwood City station reported a reading of 187. The university will continue evaluating the situation and will provide a further update later today, along with any anticipated impacts to university operations.

In the meantime, the following guidance is suggested for the campus community, and more details are available in the campus advisory on the Environmental Health & Safety website:

  • Limit strenuous outdoor activity.
  • Curtail outdoor activities that are not essential or time-sensitive. Employees, please consult with managers where there are questions or special health needs.
  • For more susceptible populations including older adults, children, and those with pulmonary/respiratory conditions, minimize time spent outdoors.
  • Consult with your health care provider if you experience smoke-related health issues.

The Dish and Matadero Trail in the Stanford foothills are being closed this afternoon due to the poor air quality and are anticipated to remain closed on Friday. Consult The Dish website for updates.

A further update will be provided later today at emergency.stanford.edu.

Monday update on air quality

As of 10 a.m. Monday morning, the measured Air Quality Index reading at the nearest monitoring station in Redwood City was 164 for particle pollution, indicating that local air quality remains in the “unhealthy” category.

As such, it is recommended that members of the Stanford community continue following precautions for their personal health and comfort due to the continuing presence of wildfire smoke. For more information, please continue to refer to the Environmental Health & Safety campus advisory, which includes these recommendations:

  • Limit strenuous outdoor activity where possible.
  • For more susceptible populations including older adults, children, and those with pulmonary/respiratory conditions, minimize time spent outdoors.
  • When indoors, keep windows and doors closed.
  • In vehicles, use air-recirculation mode.
  • Drink plenty of water to help minimize potential irritation.

Dish reopening

The Dish and Matadero Trail are scheduled to be open during normal operating hours today, Monday, November 12.

Update on air quality; Dish closure extended

According to the Bay Area Air Quality Management District, air quality continues to be unhealthy in much of the region due to wildfire smoke, and these conditions are expected to continue through Monday.

“Northeasterly winds are forecast throughout the weekend, blowing smoke into the region, where a continuing high pressure system over Northern California is trapping it at ground level and causing significant air quality impacts,” the district reports.

Precautionary guidance for the Stanford community is available on the Environmental Health & Safety website.

The Dish and Matadero Trail are expected to remain closed through the weekend. Check The Dish website for any updates if conditions change.

Stanford Athletics is providing updates on its website regarding the status of scheduled athletic events.

Dish closure; athletics updates

Due to the poor air quality from wildfire smoke, The Dish and Matadero Trail have been closed for the remainder of Friday, November 9. Gates may remain closed on Saturday if air quality remains poor. Look for updates on The Dish website. In addition, Stanford Athletics is providing updates on its website regarding the status of scheduled athletic events.

Wildfire smoke

The thoughts of the Stanford community are with the many people who have been affected by the devastating wildfires in Butte County. Smoke from the fires is present in the Bay Area today, including around the Stanford campus. Environmental Health & Safety has been providing guidance on its website for members of the Stanford community to address their personal health and comfort.

Power is restored, campus is operating normally

Power has been restored to campus buildings, and the campus will be operating normally on Thursday.

The source of Wednesday’s power outage, which affected a portion of the campus, was traced to a cable failure at a transformer serving the new Bass Biology Building, which has been under construction and has not yet been occupied. After this cable failure was isolated, power was restored at approximately 10 p.m. Wednesday night to the handful of other campus buildings that remained without power.

Work will proceed on Thursday to restore power to Bass Biology. The cause of the original outage appears to be equipment failure.

University IT staff worked overnight to ensure IT services were restored as power was restored to affected buildings. Any remaining issues can be reported to 5-HELP or by filing a ticket at services.stanford.edu.

Please refer to this document regarding entering a laboratory following a sustained power outage.

Guidance for entering labs when power is restored

If your lab has experienced a sustained loss of power, please refer to these safety instructions prior to re-entering the lab:

Post Power Outage Laboratory Re-entry Guidance

A list of affected buildings is available in previous posts, below.

Power restored to most campus buildings

Power has been restored to most buildings on campus that earlier were affected by a power outage. Power has not been restored to the following buildings:

  • Anderson Collection
  • Stauffer I
  • Stauffer II
  • Psychiatry Academic and Clinic (401 Quarry)
  • Roth Way Garage
  • Mudd Chemistry
  • Gilbert Biology
  • Paul Allen Building
  • Chemistry Gazebo

The remaining buildings will remain offline while Land, Buildings and Real Estate works to identify the exact location of the fault in the power system that led to the outage. That work will be occurring overnight.

A further update will be provided here by 7 a.m. Thursday, and we anticipate providing information about the status of the remaining buildings at that time. Students who have classes in any of these remaining buildings should check this website before heading to class. LBRE Zone Management also will be in touch with building managers in the affected buildings with more information as it is available

Additional information regarding the power outage

Crews continue working to restore power to affected parts of the campus. The process is expected to take at least several hours as individual circuits are tested and restored. The cause of the outage is still undetermined. We plan to provide further updates between 7:30 and 8 p.m. Please review previous posts below for lab safety and other pertinent information.

Update on power outage, impact on evening classes

Land, Buildings and Real Estate is continuing to work on restoring power to affected buildings, though the process is expected to take several hours.

Building access: Please be aware that card-system access to some buildings may be affected during the outage.

Phone access: Office phones may be impacted by the power outage; in an emergency, you may need to use a mobile phone to call 911.

Impact on classes and events: Classes and events will be canceled this evening in buildings affected by the power outage. A list of affected buildings as of 5 p.m. includes:

  • Graduate School of Business (All)
  • Highland Hall
  • Schwab Residential Center – Cemex
  • Schwab Residential Center – Tower Building
  • Gates
  • Paul Allen Building
  • Beckman Center
  • Psychiatry Academic and Clinic
  • Anderson Collection
  • Roth Way garage
  • Mudd Chemistry
  • Stauffer 1
  • Stauffer 2
  • Gilbert Biology
  • Chemistry Conference
  • Cantor Arts
  • McMurtry
  • Sapp Center
  • Bing Concert Hall
  • Littlefield Center
  • Lathrop
  • Art Gallery
  • Arrillaga Alumni Center
  • Lou Henry Hoover
  • Hoover Mem
  • Green Library
  • Burnham Pavilion
  • Avery Aquatic
  • Taube Family Tennis
  • Arrillaga Family Sports Center
  • Arrillaga Gymnasium & Weight Room (Maples practice gym)
  • Maples Pavilion
  • Northwest Data Center and Com. Hub
  • Central Process Steam
  • Comparative Medicine Pavilion
  • Center For Clinical Sciences Research
  • Li Ka Shing Center
  • Fairchild Science
  • Cordura Hall
  • Ventura Hall
  • Forsythe
  • James Clark Center
  • Lokey Stem Cell Research Building
  • 315 Bonair
  • 327 Bonair
  • 333 Bonair
  • 340 Bonair
  • 341 Bonair
  • Stanford Auxiliary Library II
  • Stanford Federal Credit Union (Pampas Lane)
  • Acorn House
  • Children’s Center of the Stanford Community
  • Mulberry House
  • Little Kids Place

Note that some of the affected buildings are running on backup generators and therefore have not lost power.

Additional information regarding power outage

Roughly 55 buildings on campus have lost power. Affected areas of campus include, but are not limited to

  • Pampas Lane
  • Graduate School of Business
  • Arrillaga Alumni Center
  • parts of Athletics
  • parts of the School of Medicine
  • Hoover Tower
  • Clark Center
  • Littlefield Center

It is estimated that it will take approximately 4 hours to restore power where it has been lost. Student residences and dining halls are reported to have power.

Additional lab safety recommendations

Lab researchers in buildings affected by power outage: Please cease any work with hazardous materials, and secure and leave the lab. Further updates when available.